The commission trap

So you’re an investor, and you’ve got seemingly unlimited options for your money. Some seem awesome, some look a little suspect, and for the most part, you’re not really sure what’s going to work and what to stay away from. Typically, you’d talk to some type of financial advisor. Or you’d succumb to your own hubris and decide to get online and do this whole investing thing yourself until it becomes clear that you’ve made a huge mistake, then you’d talk to some sort of financial advisor. But now instead of trying to figure out how and where to invest money, you’re trying to figure out how to pick a trustworthy advisor who can help you with the investing part. Well, I’ve got one piece of advice: watch out for the commission trap.

There are several different ways that financial professionals are paid, the two most common are through fees and through commissions. Some advisors only charge one way or the other, some do both.

A fee-based advisor means that if you’ve got money invested, the advisor collects a fee (usually a small percentage) from your investments every year. It’s a pretty simple, pretty common model, and it makes sense because the advisor is invested in your success. It definitely doesn’t mean that the advisor is trustworthy, but you can at least take comfort in the fact that it’s a sensical payment model.
On the other side is the commission trap. There are a few bad things about commissions:

  • It means you’re buying a financial product. Advisors who collect commissions only get paid when a client buys something. Financial products, while veiled as beneficial to the customer, are generally not the best option. They prey on people’s desire for security and charge a hefty premium for it (annuity). What a financial product offers can almost always be had for a fraction of the cost with a much higher ceiling for growth by simply investing in the market. Not every product is always bad, but you definitely shouldn’t be buying lots of financial products.
  • It means the advisor is collecting a large commission. These products, specifically annuities, will pay out massive sums to advisors who can peddle them. Commissions between 5% and 10%, and sometimes even more, are common. That means if you take your $500,000 investment account and buy an annuity, the advisor could be collecting between $25,000 and $50,000. That’s a lot, suspiciously a lot. Brokers will pay advisors these kinds of fees is because the product is extremely lucrative for brokers, which means it’s probably not super beneficial for customers. 
  • It means there’s a conflict of interest for the advisor. They’re stuck with the tough decision (or maybe not so tough) of educating and caring for their client and promoting their best interests or putting food on their own table for their own kids, or taking a super nice vacation, or whatever else you could get excited about buying for $50,000. Unfortunately, the advisor’s interest will likely lean toward the $50k. Better not to put yourself, or the advisor, in a conflicting situation like that. 
  • It means that you’re probably not getting coached. Advisors who sell products aren’t evil (mostly), but they have to function more like salespeople than advisors or coaches in order to survive. Best case, the salespeople are catering to clients, giving them what they want without trying to rip them off. Worst case, the salespeople are manipulating or aggressively pushing bad products to people. Either way, coaching doesn’t enter the equation. There is no correlation between a customer’s desire for or the suitability of a product and the long term success of a client. So instead of coaching and educating clients, financial salespeople end up helping clients orchestrate their own financial purgatory, never making progress towards their goals. 

So keep an eye out for the commission trap when you’re evaluating an advisor.

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